HOME  ABOUT US  MUSIC  VIDEO  ENSEMBLETIMES  LINKS  FRIENDS  CONTACT US  POLAR VOICES

 

Polar Voices – From the Arctic to the Atlantic

Thursday July 7 2016, 8pm, County Museum Dundalk  
Carroll Centre, Roden Place, Jocelyn Street,Dundalk

Music of the Arctic, Russian discoveries of an Irish Explorer
by the Leaders of Ensemble XXI
Lygia O'Riordan, Narratror Pia Siirala, Violin

TICKETS  

Polar Voices – From the Arctic to the Atlantic presents the music of the Russian Arctic's indigenous people in film and describes in readings from diaries, written during the field trips of “Polar Voices”, life among the nomads and the Small Nations of the Russian Arctic. The Finnish violinist, Pia Siirala will perform her composition for solo violin on indigenous themes “Ulita's Walk”. Polar Voices – From the Arctic to the Atlantic also introduces the story of the great Irish 19th century explorer, Henry Kellett who discovered the two islands in the Russian Arctic that today make up the Russian National Arctic Park, also known as the “Nursery of Polar Bears”. Kellett worked with the ancestors of the indigenous people with whom Ensemble XXI now works in Chukotka and Kamchatka. Kellett’s story brings Ireland directly into the Oval office in a most unique and extraordinary way.

 

 

Lygia O'Riordan and Pia Siirala performing 
in Aula Maxima NUI Galway on April 18th 2016

 

 

 
EDITORIAL

Changing one's hearing

Recently I was party to a discussion about how one's hearing can change when exposed to indigenous music. I had never really thought about this before, but on reflection realise that it is indeed so. This set me thinking about how my hearing has changed radically during my life as a musician and I would have to say that there were two very important changes over the course of the years. 
The first was during my first year at the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory. I was no stranger to contemporary music and regarding Soviet contemporary music was well acquainted with the music of Alfred Schnittke. I was not prepared, however, for the barrage of new Soviet repertoire that I would be subjected to day in and day out as my Professor, Gennady Rozhdestvensky, opened his season of concerts. Each concert would introduce two of Haydn's late symphonies as well as two new works by Soviet composers. As an integral part of our training under Rozhdestvensky meant attending every rehearsal without fail, as well as his concerts, I had, to put it mildly, an earful of Soviet contemporary music. Moreover, when one of the pianists of our conducting class presented her latest piano concerto to Gennady Nikolaevich, he liked it so much that he included it in the season. Now there was no avoiding all this new Soviet repertoire in the classroom either! To be honest I was shell-shocked and breathed a sigh of relief when the year was over and we studied Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Stravinsky and Schnittke. 
It was only the following summer when I attended a contemporary music festival that I realised I had absolutely no issues with the most difficult of contemporary music and indeed enjoyed listening to even the most outlandish new works. This would not have been the case had it not been for that first season of Gennady Rozhdestvensky. As a result, from the very early years of Ensemble XXI's existence, I conducted many a world premiere of contemporary music. 

The second time that my hearing changed was in a quite different situation. I was in the Far East of Russia on Sakhalin when I was invited to the annual spring festival of the indigenous Nivkh people. I was thrilled to experience their music first hand, as I have always had a great interest in traditional music and in ancient cultures. My father had introduced me at an early age to the extraordinary work of Sean O'Riada who dedicated his life to collecting Irish traditional music before it was too late and my New Zealand mother had gone to school alongside the indigenous Maori people (unlike Australia where the aboriginals were terribly discriminated against, Maori children were integrated into the New Zealand school system). Moreover when I studied at the Liszt Academy in Budapest it was mandatory for every student to study folk music. This was fortuitous as the Professor of Folk Music was László Vikár, who had studied with both Bartók and Kodály. 
It was therefore with great excitement that I travelled to the north of Sakhalin island to meet the Nivkh people. The experience was overwhelming and the music sung by the Elders, inspirational. On return to Yuzhno Sakhalinsk, I was taken to meet the Matriarch of the Nivkhs, Ulita who was in her late 90's and was blind and bedridden. It was extremely touching to experience the warmth with which she greeted me and her willingness to allow me to record her singing. I was not to know it then but when Ulita agreed to let me record her singing, she sang a song that not even scholars dedicated to the music of the Nivkhs, had ever heard before. 
On the flight through 9 time zones back to Moscow, I listened to my recording of Ulita and to another recording given to me by other Nivkh singers. I was enchanted and moved by the music and knew then that something had to be done to further record and preserve this music for posterity. 
Thus Polar Voices was born. The first work of Polar Voices was carried out with field trips to the Nivkhs on Sakhalin. We also decided to hold our Pacific Rim Music Festival in the Nivkh territory and commissioned a composer to write a composition based on Nivkh themes. The composition began with a Nivkh singer, Tyotya Lida, one of the older generation, singing a Nivkh melody, which was then taken up by the Ensemble XXI musicians. The Nivkh singer remained in the midst of the musicians, her body swaying at the highly contagious rhythms as emotion passed over her face as she recognised the Nivkh songs running through the work. How, I wondered, will the Nivkhs audience react? The excitement was palpable as the piece continued and themes were recognised by the Nivkhs. Not only themes, but also the rhythms and the original instruments themselves that go back to Neolithic times. In place of the ‘tyatya chxach’, a log, engraved with bear heads on either side, which is beaten as their main percussion instrument, the musicians of Ensemble XXI knocked on the wood of their instruments. 
Certainly the hearing of Nivkhs was changed that night as they heard their own traditional music played on string instruments and brought into a new piece of 21st century music. 

Back, however, to the change in my own hearing. Next, Polar Voices carried out field trips to even more distant areas in the Russian Arctic-to Kamchatka and Chukotka, which concentrated in particular on the music of the Chukchi and Koryak indigenous peoples. Unlike the Nivkh music I found their music extremely challenging, both melodically and rhythmically. Fundamentally, I could not easily identify either aspect of this music. Gradually though, over the months of editing the field diaries and listening back to the recordings and films made, I now have no idea what the problem was. 

I am sure that these two changes in my hearing will not be the last and that I will be challenged again!

 

Previous editorials

POLAR VOICES
From the Arctic to the Atlantic

Monday, April 18th 2016 at 7.30.pm for 8.00pm, NUI Galway, Aula Maxima



Music of the Arctic, Russian discoveries of an Irish Explorer & the Oval Office Desk


Conductor Lygia O'Riordan will present a performance dedicated to the ancient music of the indigenous people of the Russian Arctic, as well as the story of the great Irish explorer, Henry Kellett in the Arctic. It describes Ensemble XXI's Arctic work in film, recordings and photography as well as life among the reindeer herders in readings from diaries written during the ''Polar Voices'' field trips. The Leader of Ensemble XXI, Finnish violinist Pia Siirala,will also perform her composition for solo violin on indigenous themes, ''Ulita's Walk''.

Polar Voices is dedicated to the study and preservation of the music of the indigenous people of the Russian Arctic.
The world is rightly concentrating on the disappearance of ice and creatures in the Arctic as we witness the horror of climate change, yet there is another catastrophe occurring in the Arctic too: the disappearance of the cultural treasures of small nations. It can be compared to white washing of ancient cave paintings or the destruction of ancient artefacts. In the case of the ancient music from Palaeolithic times, once it goes to the grave with the indigenous Elders it can never be heard again.''
From the Arctic to the Atlantic presents this music in film and describes in readings from diaries written during the field trips of ''Polar Voices'' life amongst the nomads and the Small Nations of the Russian Arctic. Pia Siirala will also perform her composition for solo violin on indigenous themes Ulita's Walk
''It will come as no great surprise to anyone in Ireland that even in the Arctic you will find a dramatic Irish story'', says conductor Lygia O'Riordan. ''This is indeed one of the great hidden pieces of Irish history in the Russian Arctic and the story of an Irish explorer who should be a household name in Ireland. Vice Admiral Sir Henry Kellett was one of the British Navy's foremost Arctic explorers in the 19th century. He discovered the two islands, Herald and Wrangel that now make up the Russian National Arctic Park, also known as the nursery of Polar Bears. Much of his success in the Arctic and in particular in the regions where we have been working with the indigenous peoples was because of his close interaction with the ancestors of the same indigenous peoples''. 
From the Arctic to the Atlantic will also tell the extraordinary story of how Vice Admiral Henry Kellett from Tipperary brought Ireland right into the Oval Office. 

The Hunt Museum

Friday, October 2nd 2015 at 1pm

The Custom House 
Rutland Street, Limerick, Ireland

Áras Éanna Arts Centre, Inis Oírr, 
 
The Aran Islands, Ireland 
Tuesday, July 7th, 2015 8.30pm

Ensemble XXI wishes to thank
Áras Éanna
Lally Tours

Polar Voices is dedicated to the study and preservation of the music of the indigenous people of the Russian Arctic.
The world is rightly concentrating on the disappearance of ice and creatures in the Arctic as we witness the horror of climate change, yet there is another catastrophe occurring in the Arctic too: the disappearance of the cultural treasures of small nations. It can be compared to white washing of ancient cave paintings or the destruction of ancient artefacts. In the case of the ancient music from Palaeolithic times, once it goes to the grave with the indigenous Elders it can never be heard again.''
From the Arctic to the Atlantic presents this music in film and describes in readings from diaries written during the field trips of ''Polar Voices'' life amongst the nomads and the Small Nations of the Russian Arctic. Pia Siirala will also perform her composition for solo violin on indigenous themes Ulita's Walk
''It will come as no great surprise to anyone in Ireland that even in the Arctic you will find a dramatic Irish story'', says conductor Lygia O'Riordan. ''This is indeed one of the great hidden pieces of Irish history in the Russian Arctic and the story of an Irish explorer who should be a household name in Ireland. Vice Admiral Sir Henry Kellett was one of the British Navy's foremost Arctic explorers in the 19th century. He discovered the two islands, Herald and Wrangel that now make up the Russian National Arctic Park, also known as the nursery of Polar Bears. Much of his success in the Arctic and in particular in the regions where we have been working with the indigenous peoples was because of his close interaction with the ancestors of the same indigenous peoples''. 

From the Arctic to the Atlantic will also tell the extraordinary story of how Vice Admiral Henry Kellett from Tipperary brought Ireland right into the Oval Office

ENSEMBLE XXI AROUND THE GLOBE

Ensemble XXI Fundraising Concert
St. Augustine's Church, Galway


The St. Petersburg Premiere of 
Haydn's Orfeo ed Euridice  

under the baton of 
Richard Bonynge

Pacific Rim Music Festival

Australia 
bringing music to audiences in smaller and
more remote communities, where 400 children attended the concert performed for an Aboriginal community for the first time.
 
Dame Joan Sutherland opens press conference with Lygia O'Riordan...

The Sakhalin Indigenous Nivkh People & Ensemble XXI perform together...

Excerpts from 
"Nivkh Themes" by Pia Siirala with authentic Nivkh singing

Guest writer, leading critic and writer on music, Howard Smith writes about Ensemble XXI's  return back to the Bolshoi Zal after a 9 year ban

"Gennady Roszhdestvensky
and his pupils"
Händel Concerti Grossi op 6. excerpts online

Lygia O'Riordan, conductor of Ensemble XXI, brought Händel’s Messiah beyond the Urals for the first time ever on the  Russian Far East's island of Sakhalin...

"Messiah" as never before 
by Guest writer Howard Smith in Music &Vision... 

Ensemble XXI's Vivaldi Four Seasons in a yurtEnsemble XXI visits the Arctic Circle and plays to the Nomadic Nenets in the Tundra 
Watch ABC documentary 
The Reindeer Serenade

"Russian Music Days" in Ireland.

Tours and 
Master classes on Sakhalin
Teaching children is part of Ensemble XXI's educational programme in Russian regions. Master Class with Pia Siirala

Ensemble XXI
at the
Sydney 
Opera House

 

 

 

reativity in Silence Residence in Finland     
The Premiere on Arvo Pärt's "Trisalgon"
written for Ensemble XXI
PRESS(in Russian) d The Irish Times...